2001 Vol. 14, No. 1_2

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CONFERENCE PROGRAM
2001, 14(1_2): Ⅰ-Ⅳ.
Opening Remarks
ZHU Qing-sheng, KRAISID TONTISIRIN, CHRISTOPHE LEPRTRE
2001, 14(1_2): Ⅴ-Ⅵ.
Welcome Address
ALEX MALASPINA
2001, 14(1_2): Ⅶ-Ⅺ.
Science as the Basis for Public Health Decisions in Nutrition and Food Safety in Asia
KRAISID TONTISIRIN, RENATA CLARKE
2001, 14(1_2): 1-13.
Practical Approaches to Risk Assessment
SIMON BROOKE-TAYLOR
2001, 14(1_2): 14-20.
The importance of using risk assessment in developing foodregulations is growing with the globalization of our food supply. The World Trade Organization has entrenched the principles of science-based risk assessment in the Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures. The relevant international organization for food standards, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, recognises risk analysis, and its component parts risk assessment, risk management and risk communication, as the basis for scientific decision-making. Risk assessment comprises two activities: hazard evaluation; and exposure estimation. A hazard may be chemical, microbiological or nutritional in origin. The practical application of risk assessment in Australia is illustrated in this presentation by four examples involving: (1) food additives, (2) microbiological safety of imported raw milk cheeses, (3) genetically modified foods and (4) imported food inspection.
Risk Management-An Industry Approach
Ray Yip, ANTHONY C.HUGGETT
2001, 14(1_2): 21-29.
An effective risk management system covering the whole process offood production from “farm to fork” is required by the food industry in order to assure that the food provided to consumers is safe. Food safety and quality assurance begins with the design and development of food products starting with product conceptualisation and continuing with the selection, purchasing, and evaluation of raw materials and with the specificati