Volume 24 Issue 2
Apr.  2011
Turn off MathJax
Article Contents

GE WenZhen, CHEN RenJie, SONG WeiMin, KAN HaiDong. Daily Visibility and Hospital Admission in Shanghai, China[J]. Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, 2011, 24(2): 117-121. doi: 10.3967/0895-3988.2011.02.005
Citation: GE WenZhen, CHEN RenJie, SONG WeiMin, KAN HaiDong. Daily Visibility and Hospital Admission in Shanghai, China[J]. Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, 2011, 24(2): 117-121. doi: 10.3967/0895-3988.2011.02.005

Daily Visibility and Hospital Admission in Shanghai, China

doi: 10.3967/0895-3988.2011.02.005
Funds:  the National Basic Research Program (973 program) of China(2011CB503802)%Gong-Yi Program of China Ministry of Environmental Protection(200809109)%National Natural Science Foundation of China(30800892)%Shanghai Pu Jiang Program(09PJ1401700)%Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University(NCET-09-0314)%National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program)(2007AA06Z409)
  • Objective The study is to investigate the associations between visibility, major air pollutants and daily counts of hospital admission in Shanghai, China. Methods Daily data on hospital admission, visibility, and air pollution during 2005-2008 were obtained from the Shanghai Insurance Bureau (SHIB), Shanghai Meteorological Bureau, and Shanghai Environmental Monitoring Center, respectively. The generalized additive model (GAM) with penalized splines was used to examine the associations between daily visibility and hospital admission. Results Among various pollutants, PM<,2.5> showed strongest correlation with visibility. Decreased visibility was significantly associated with increased risk of hospital admission in Shanghai. An inter-quartile range decrease in the 2-day (L01) moving average of visibility corresponded to 3.66% (95%Cl:1.02%, 6.31%), 4.06% (95%Cl:0.84%, 7.27%), and 4.32% (95%Cl:1.67%, 6.97%) increase of total, cardiovascular, and respiratory hospitalizations, respectively. Conclusion Our analyses provide the first piece of evidence in China, demonstrating that decreased visibility has an effect on hospital admission, and this finding strengthens the rationale for further limiting air pollution levels in Shanghai.
  • 加载中
  • 加载中
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
  • 1. 

    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

  1. 本站搜索
  2. 百度学术搜索
  3. 万方数据库搜索
  4. CNKI搜索

Article Metrics

Article views(1292) PDF downloads(41) Cited by()

Proportional views
Related

Daily Visibility and Hospital Admission in Shanghai, China

doi: 10.3967/0895-3988.2011.02.005
Funds:  the National Basic Research Program (973 program) of China(2011CB503802)%Gong-Yi Program of China Ministry of Environmental Protection(200809109)%National Natural Science Foundation of China(30800892)%Shanghai Pu Jiang Program(09PJ1401700)%Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University(NCET-09-0314)%National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program)(2007AA06Z409)

Abstract: Objective The study is to investigate the associations between visibility, major air pollutants and daily counts of hospital admission in Shanghai, China. Methods Daily data on hospital admission, visibility, and air pollution during 2005-2008 were obtained from the Shanghai Insurance Bureau (SHIB), Shanghai Meteorological Bureau, and Shanghai Environmental Monitoring Center, respectively. The generalized additive model (GAM) with penalized splines was used to examine the associations between daily visibility and hospital admission. Results Among various pollutants, PM<,2.5> showed strongest correlation with visibility. Decreased visibility was significantly associated with increased risk of hospital admission in Shanghai. An inter-quartile range decrease in the 2-day (L01) moving average of visibility corresponded to 3.66% (95%Cl:1.02%, 6.31%), 4.06% (95%Cl:0.84%, 7.27%), and 4.32% (95%Cl:1.67%, 6.97%) increase of total, cardiovascular, and respiratory hospitalizations, respectively. Conclusion Our analyses provide the first piece of evidence in China, demonstrating that decreased visibility has an effect on hospital admission, and this finding strengthens the rationale for further limiting air pollution levels in Shanghai.

GE WenZhen, CHEN RenJie, SONG WeiMin, KAN HaiDong. Daily Visibility and Hospital Admission in Shanghai, China[J]. Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, 2011, 24(2): 117-121. doi: 10.3967/0895-3988.2011.02.005
Citation: GE WenZhen, CHEN RenJie, SONG WeiMin, KAN HaiDong. Daily Visibility and Hospital Admission in Shanghai, China[J]. Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, 2011, 24(2): 117-121. doi: 10.3967/0895-3988.2011.02.005

Catalog

    /

    DownLoad:  Full-Size Img  PowerPoint
    Return
    Return